DeAACS.com

AACS, like CSS, will be a success. Not at preventing piracy. That’s not the primary objective of any DRM system. Anyone who has read the CSS license agreement knows that the primary objective is to control the market for players. Don’t you just love when your DVD player tells you “This operation is prohibited” when you try to skip the intro?

6 years ago I didn’t think of registering decss.com. Not intending to make the same mistake twice, a while ago I registered deaacs.com.

Now if only products that implement AACS would come to market…

90 thoughts on “DeAACS.com

  1. Wiley

    Since you’re domestic (to the US now) what level of concern do you have about the DMCA? Or are you simply planning to throw caution to the wind for protest/moral reasons?

  2. Block Sheep

    > Don’t you just love when your DVD player tells you “This operation is prohibited” when you try to skip the intro?

    Just last night I wasted 4 minutes of my life having to watch previews before seeing the feature presentation on the Fantastic Four DVD. I couldn’t skip the chapter, skip to the menu, or even fast forward. How rude!

    (of course I could have gone into the other room and ripped out everything but the movie, but my fiancee wanted to watch the movie right away – so we waited the four minutes instead of the ten or so to remove the extra crap from the disc)

  3. Tom

    I’m glad to hear it, and since for some reason you don’t allow pinging I will just note that I linked it in this comment.

    Looking forward to seeing HD-DVD support in XBMC360 ;)

  4. cookie

    block sheep: is why it’s nice to watch DVDs on xine… you can skip right ahead in there ;) though i’ve found a few DVDs whose keys fail to be cracked (like National Treasure, Aqua Teen Hunger Force vol. 1), I’ll need to see if it’s the version of decss I have or what, though I think it’s up to date. Works for almost all, though :) Time for Linux in the living room? :D

    jon: Rock on.

  5. Viper

    Whow, so here it comes again. I wish you the best of luck with whatever your planning!

  6. Anonymous Coward

    You shouldn’t talk about this.
    I mean you already know that for some time ppl keep saying “hi def are coming out, DVD jon get ready for work”
    You are just adding more fuel to them. But you don’t mind public pressure…

    Anyway, did you noticed that all the major protections for the rest of thee decade are coming out this year: aacs (blu-ray, hd-dvd), PS3, Nintendo Revolution, xbox 360, vista, Mac os X for intel. 2006 gonna be a busy year for hackers.

    just wonderin’ which one will one be hacked first… probably os X86

  7. Andrew

    So do you think that AACS will, unlike CSS, be successful at preventing open-source playback?

  8. TKDWILSON

    “”"”" i’ve found a few DVDs whose keys fail to be cracked (like National Treasure, Aqua Teen Hunger Force vol. 1),”"”"”"

    I know I will probably be mobbed for suggesting this, but DVDSHRINK works well for all those movies. DVDFAB works for all movies that shink can’t. Got a dual boot for windows??? Or maybe you could get one working under wine. Of course both were probably based on Jon’s hard work. :-)

    Eric Wilson

  9. Luc

    Not being able to skip previews is bad, but I’ll tell you what’s worse.

    I picked up a DVD recorder (for the TV) last year to record some of my favorite shows so I can watch them whenever. And so I did, for about a year, from Comcast Digital Cable. Now, guess what happens, my DVD player tells me I can’t record #@**%. That’s right, almost every show is blocked, I get a little message about 5 seconds into recording anything saying “This picture cannot be recorded”.

    Imagine if you programmed your VCR to record a show for you when you’re at work and when you came back all you saw was a message saying you can’t record anything.

    I’m very dissapointed in Sony, Comcast and the Broadcasters. This is total BS. Now my $300 investment is worthless because it tells me I can’t record anything, what’s the purpose of it then?

    Luc L.

  10. milestone78

    Excellent! :))

    Just in style: When would you like to register “deblueray.com”? :D

    btw, good luck for AACS and take care

    AG

  11. Viper

    Hey pwnage, why dont you try to crack it. Give Jon a break, you are lucky he does all this for you. He is not getting paid and he can work an anything he wants to.

  12. Scary

    The removal of these protections is a miracle to me…my dvi port on my plasma is not HDCP compliant, so only discs with removed copy protection can be played on my upconversion dvd player. Keep up the good work guys, and keep my tv from obsolescence!

  13. dave

    “Who gives two shits about AACS. What about De-[FairPlay] AAC?”

    Ey? Hasn’t everyone cracked that already? Even REAL NETWORKS??????? So nobody gives two shits about your post i’d imagine.

  14. Begin23

    Does anyone remember the Max Headroom TV show? Are we really headed toward an age of forced advertising? Maybe they should start installing a quiz after the advertisements and previews that you have to answer correctly in order to watch the DVD.

  15. _V_

    I doubt that any difference that Microsoft has introduced to the DRM for HD-DVD (when compaired to that for Blu-ray) is in the best interest of the consumers. So I hope, those pining for debluray.com and related software are betting on Blu-ray winning whatever competition there will be between Blu-ray and HD-DVD.

  16. Todd Abbott

    Crack away, then we will not have to worry about the format wars so much. You can rip your disks, that you legally own, and copy them over to the other format.

  17. Robert

    To the person who could not record content from digital cable via a DVD player. That is only a sign of things to come. They want to put that same stupid flag in all content including a version for analog signals. They keep saying they would only limit things like pay per view but COME ON PEOPLE!!! When you give any corporation, which by definition are amoral entities, a means to profit do you think they will not pursue it? The long term goal here is to get you to pay for either a rerun or for the disc version of any content you view or hear. Providing you with any real means to record content would be counterproductive to that goal. It will take time, but slowly with each so called new service or upgrade they will further limit your ability to make copies until you have none left. In time any device made will have to assume content it is recording is copyrighted or risk allowing a free copy so you will even have to pay for them for the privilege of having a tool to sign that your own content with proof it is free. You will pay what you think is a small amount of money for what was free to view before but if you add it up, hundreds of dollars will be spent and the concept of free expression and art will have died. This is the abomination they want with these new special rights they are currently asking the legislators for, the ability to charge for any all expression as they and only they see fit.

  18. Willie Doit

    Oh crap, now someone who can make decisions in the industry will read that, think it’s a great idea and make it happen…

    Just buy a Phillips PVP642, rip your favorite DVD’s, or the ones you rent, or check out USENET…

    http://www.digg.com/search?search=dvp642

    Plays DVD, DVD-R/RW, DVD+R/+RW, CD, CD-R/RW, VCD, SVCD, MP3-CD, MPEG-4, Picture-CD and DivX 3.11/4.x/5.x, AVI. 4x video upsampling enhances all outputs. Also plays JPEG, mpg, Xvid, PAL DVDs, PAL Divx, KVCD, SRT. It also has Progressive scan and 4x upsampling. Also removes Macrovision copy protection so you can make a backup VHS copy of your favorite DVD’s.

  19. Pete

    Nothing worse than those dvd’s which force you to sit through minutes of crap. Reauthoring is still a PITA, but a necessary operation.

  20. Guspaz

    “Who gives two shits about AACS. What about De-[FairPlay] AAC?”

    1) AACS is going to be used by BOTH HDDVD and BluRay, which are both replacing DVD. If you want to be able to watch your future videos on portable devices like an iPod, somebody is going to have to crack it.

    2) FairPlay was cracked ages ago. Jon himself was the first one to crack it something like two years ago. The current popular application that cracks FairPlay is called “Hymn”. I won’t link to it, but do a google search for “hymn drm” and it’ll be the first link.

  21. Roomba

    I would just like to stick the movie in and have it ply, I do not need all that other BS. I have some movies that work like a video game you have to do clicks in the corect order and you unlock somthin special, this is BS just let us see it all and stop mess with my time.

  22. SquirrelNuts

    In 2002, a crack commando was brought to court by a bunch of idiots for a crime he didn’t commit. He promptly escaped a maximum sentence of 2yrs or large fine to the RIAA ridden US. Today, still wanted by the RIAA, he survives as a soldier of fortune. If you have a DRM problem, if no one else can help, and if you can find him, maybe you can hire…DVD Jon.

  23. Steve Bryan

    Just last night I wasted 4 minutes of my life having to watch previews before seeing the feature presentation on the Fantastic Four DVD.

    Hey, you wasted more than just 4 minutes, I’ve seen that movie (a rim shot would be useful here). Sorry, I couldn’t resist it.

  24. matt

    blocksheep: those darned trailers…

    two tips:
    - fast forward (as soon as movie starts, it goes back to normal speed)
    - a tip I read elsewhere, which I were able to verify on three different DVDs:
    –> insert DVD
    –> press play
    –> press stop TWICE
    –> press play
    –> movie starts

  25. pwnage

    “Hey pwnage, why dont you try to crack it.”

    ’cause the only thing I can crack is my ass! :-D

  26. Bruce

    the primary objective of AACS is to control the market for players? I don’t get it. How is any one company controlling the market for players here? There are many companies behind Blu-ray and HD-DVD, for instance. AACS or not, how is any one company ‘controlling the market for players’?

  27. Dimitris

    Hey Jon,

    Crap like this from the media industry caused me to kick my cable TV habit several months ago. I therefore have extra beer money available, so when you make it to Seattle drop me a line and I’ll buy you a few pints.

  28. deviator

    I am still waiting for DVD-Audio Verance watermark remove tool. Unfortunately no one did it. To be honest, who is watching films more than 1/year same title? But a lot of ppl listen same albums few times each year.

  29. Arley Junior

    I Read the last report on you! I liked the ” project ” too much like this deaacs.com.Continue mind diamond! My congratulations!
    Arley Júnior
    Sacramento – Minas Gerais – Brazil

  30. Luis

    Anonymous Coward said:

    > You shouldn’t talk about this.

    You are not him.
    So let him decide his own actions.

  31. Igor

    Hi Jon.. how you doing?

    Im designer.. if you have some help with logos… and some designs.. i would to help….

    Thanks!

    Igor

  32. MPAA

    “Maybe they should start installing a quiz after the advertisements and previews that you have”

    Hey that’s a great idea! I’ll see about getting that rolled into AACS 1.0 spec, along with the cordite wiring for disabling hacked players and players caught playing bootleg disks.

  33. Morten Juhl Johansen

    In Denmark, DeCSS is legal to the extent it is needed to watch legally purchased DVDs – which is an interesting move, but I suspect our politicians have their heads up MS’ rectum that they can’t see tp protect other big business. When corporate interests start breaking down your door in the US, feel free to crash at my place…

  34. Mtk

    I have no problems skipping the intro titles in Xbox media center. Not to mention how easy it is to make a perfect copy of a dvd using DVD2xbox. But running those copy protected discs under Linux will be a problem at the start of the MPAA ages (or should I call it days?)

  35. Mike

    All I can say is, “Thank You”.

    I’m able to play backup copies of my purchased DVDs on all my purchased players (xbox, Minivan DVD, Linux workstation, $30 Best Buy special).

  36. elfguy

    I’m so sick of companies trying everything they possibly can to screw people over and get the most power / money they can. It’s all the same thing: Sony rootkit, DVD protections, iTunes DRM, the DMCA, the analog hole, it’s all the same bunch of giant companies buying laws and trying to screw everyone over. I refuse to buy any of that and stick with analog recording until those people get a clue, which will hopefully happen if people realize Blue-Ray and HD-DVD are even more restrictive and don’t buy them.

  37. Christian

    if something is created by humans then can be hacked :P
    maybe in one or two years will be awesome then someone will appear and f*cked up your creation ^^

    greets!

  38. sogasg

    I think Jon don’t manage to break the AACS first, because it is many more people who going to try to break the AACS than it was trying to break the CSS.

    But I hope his first because he is from Norway.

  39. Slappycakes

    First, I want to say thank you for what you’ve done for the Linux community regarding the driver support. It’s amazing that one person could change a market so fast, especially all the software applications that use your work.

    Good luck and rock on!

  40. JOe

    Use the Deaacs site as an ultimatum. Say something like

    “Give end users the ability to skip any content, the right to make backup copies easily (on consumer versions of the disks), and remove region encoding, or we will release Deaacs to give consumer their rights back”

  41. Jack

    From some popular articles that I’ve read, the protection scheme used in HDDVD and Blue Ray players will be able to reprogram the devices without user knowledge just by playing bought or rented newer disc that has updated scheme included. This suppose to protect media giants from hackers simply by discouraging cracking since every crack known to RIAA will be quickly made obsolete by reprogramming the players (at least regarding new releases). I hope, this is just a PR BS from the creators of the AACS. Otherwise, we are screwed. If the scheme will be a moving target how much time and effort any human being will be able to commit to the task of breaking the code and how much time and effort will users be able to waste on never ending downloading of freshly cracked codes ?

    JAM

  42. lvdata

    I will make a prediction on Blu-ray vs HD-DVD. The one that will ultimatley be more popular will be the one that gets cracked first. Jon please crack HD DVD’s version of AACS first, so root-kit-sony will die with the blu-ray PS3′s. Good luck, I think your gonna need it. lvdata

  43. Macavity

    >In 2002, a crack commando was brought to court by a bunch of idiots for a crime he didn’t commit. He promptly escaped a maximum sentence of 2yrs or large fine to the RIAA ridden US. Today, still wanted by the RIAA, he survives as a soldier of fortune. If you have a DRM problem, if no one else can help, and if you can find him, maybe you can hire…DVD Jon.

    SquirrelNuts – you’re f*ckin’ hilarious, dude.

    DVD Jon – Keep up the good work. Maybe if enough people crack the shitty DRM these companies use, they’ll eventually give it up as a bad job. (Probably not, but we can hope . . . )

  44. Uber0n

    I just wanted tell you that you are a hero here in Sweden. All my friends would probably sit staring into the ground if it wasn’t for your work.

    Keep up the good work!

  45. marmot

    I totally agree with Lsv.

    You should market your own DRM.

    People do need to protect their works. DRM is going to happen. Wouldn’t it be great if the standard that “won” the industry was one which was written to protect the works and their authors and not the BS corporations who really just want to control *you*?

  46. Greg

    I think you should concentrate on iTunes 6/FairPlay. A lot of people are looking up to you to get a fix out for the new version of iTunes 6.

    Just my two cents.

  47. Robert

    Someone mentioned the abilty these devices have to be reprogrammed if the DRM is broken. This can only go so far with this. Remember while they may do this and thus protect all new content from a given point forward. I doubt they are going to want to make it impossible to play all old content so it has to be backwards compatible.

    In thinking about it, once the system is well understood and several devices’ mother keys are well known you could essentialy create a bunch of emulated devices with these known product keys. If you built the emulation well enough, any upgrade would essentially upgrade your psedo device. At which time you would have created an instant crack for the new scheme. What I imagine is that you flash or mod the firmware on a given device to simply obey the commands of your driver and then forward all commands back and forth to it via the psuedo device making sure to manipulate any commands that might reveal the emulation. The psuedo device would be blind to the fact it is only an emulation and the hardware would work no matter what. This concept works well because in order to stop it they would have to invalidate a largre group of valid device keys. Can you imagine if one of these was an Xbox or Play Station, not going to happen.

  48. Vez

    Robert is right. The “self-updating via new disc” DRM is impossible. First of all it has to be able to identify a cracked copy, which won’t be able to deal with 1. DRM-free content such as home-made movies, and 2. flawless replicas of the original disc that still have the DRM happily in place, with no realization that it’s been copied.

    I wouldn’t put it past the Corporate Emperors to decide to ban #1, regardless of what it’ll do to the market for video cameras and consumer oriented video editing software, but they can’t stop #2.

    Everything will be cracked, true, but what we should really hope for is that DRM becomes so associated with needless restriction and security problems that no company would dare to use one. Unfornately, people are too dumb to figure out that A. it’s important and B. exactly how well a really widespread boycott could work.

  49. Mr. Hex

    Well I must say that if Jon were to crack the AACS or whatever new ‘media format’ that happens to come along, he won’t have too many problems. You had better believe that those folks in the ACLU have Jon’s number. For some folks this could start a very small, concise grass roots movement. Honestly I would love to see a test case to go before the United States Supreme court on the issue of fair use. Jon’s name is so widely known that I honestly would be surprised if the case was lost in court.

    With that said who would be willing to start a donation defense fund for Jon via say Paypal or something?

  50. DUH

    Nobody cares about gayTunes and that iGay stuff. Don’t want DRM’ed files then don’t buy DRM’ed files! That’s stupid. You’re financially supporting something you’re against, willing to pay for something you got to hack to be usable… You only have yourself to blame here, you’re voting against yourself with your money. If you’re not willing to help yourself, why should people bother helping you (for something that sucks anyways)? Keep digging your hole if you insist, but stop complaining and begging for help.

    AACS is a VERY different story. It’ll be on both next gen video disc formats. There won’t be a way to not have it get in the way. It’ll require major hardware [HDMI card & monitor, new HDTVs, new players] and software [Vista] compromises (and expenses). It most likely won’t even work on many [non-approved by the MPAA] OS’es like Linux. Forget about open source/free/3rd party players. Forget about fair use rights. Forget about making backups/conversions/reencodes for your PDA/Phone/PSP/whatever. It’ll be quite nasty. Just bend over and take it. *ALL* HD contents will use it. The only alternative is to stay with an ancient outdated format or not watch anything at all.

    This is MUCH more important than some useless DRMed music store is ever going to be (until it turns out to be the very last place one can ever buy music).

  51. Todd

    DUH, the way you describe AACS, I’m suddenly not so worried. It sounds so draconian that nobody will buy it! I have actually been reading about China’s EVD format. It’s nowhere near as high-tech (still using red lasers), but the consumer electronics players are supposed to be nearly royalty-free. I haven’t decided how open the actual codecs are, though, see http://www.on2.com .

  52. Not So Hollywood

    With all due respect to Jon, I think you’re missing the point. This is about preventing piracy, but just a little bit. And it is about forcing ads down consumer’s throats, but just a little bit. The REAL target is competition from independents.

    A HD camera costs $6000, and is about the resolution of 16mm film. The folks over at red.com claim to have an affordable digital camera that SURPASSES the resolution of 35mm film. (red.com hasn’t listed a price yet, so it might all be vaporware).

    But the point is, an indepentent movie director can spend very little money to end up with a stellar picture quality. $6000 for the camera, maybe $1500 for lights. With special effects packages costing $1200 (and with free alternatives quickly catching up to commercial offerings), a director could make a science-fiction blockbuster in his friend’s garage for under $10,000. (Given enough time, and enough talent.)

    But how could such a director distribute his wonderful movie? He can’t. Or, he can, but only in single-definition. He can put an unencrypted HD video online for download, but Vista/OS X will refuse to play it at full resolution. People could burn the video to an unencrypted blu-ray or whatever, but the players will refuse to play it at full resolution.

    No, our hypothetical director will have to shell out $50,000 per title per YEAR to gain access to the encryption keys. (I’m not making this up. See the license agreements at HDCP’s site). THAT is what this is about. The media cartel hired the tech cartel to completely eliminate the independent digital filmmaking market.

    That is why “deaccs” is vitally, vitally important.

  53. luck

    hacking AACS is not as easy as CSS,but I don`t think it will be to difficult,the problem is HDCP.
    good luck!

  54. Joovilhar

    Why not just encourage everyone you know to not buy HD-DVD or Blu-Ray?

    It’s easy enough. DVD prices have never been cheaper (at the moment, they are a bargain – and you also know your rights to play them back can never be revoked!), and in a couple of years time we’ll have HVD discs – which will provide about 33x the capacity of Blu-Ray (or 40x the capacity of HD-DVD). DVD is about 12 years old already – who is going to mind waiting another two years for something that’s 33-40x better than a format that’s only going to be 3-4x (at best) better than DVD9?

    It’s not too difficult to persuade even the most avid of film buffs that Blu-Ray/HD-DVD are the next Betamax, especially as vastly superior storage technology is literally just around the corner. When the film studios see Blu-Ray and HD-DVD sales fail to take off, they will be left with no choice but to factor in the wishes of the consumer. It’s not an impossible dream – just sit on your money, and encourage others to do the same. It’s not like HDTV is an essential part of life!

  55. Muddle

    The reason your having problems with some new DVD’s is probably Sony’s ARccOS encryption. http://www.sonydadc.com/products.copy.arccos.go
    You need the last version of DVD Decrypter, if you can find it, or DVD FabDecrypter for Windows only. I don’t know of any Linux solution available that can handle ARccOS. Although if all you want to do is play DVD’s on your Linux box LinDVD might do it, however it’s not a free open source application. Last I checked LinDVD could not be purchased as a stand alone program, one had to purchase a Linux OS such as TurboLinux media edition along with a licence to use it. If it’s anything like WinDVD you have to register the application via the web and can’t install it on more than one computer. In other words, you can’t just give copies of it to your friends. Then again LinDVD is one of those applications designed to prohibit skipping content.

  56. Deez Nutz

    Dude,
    How about throwing in de-HDCP while you’re at it …

    Niels Ferguson said in 2001 it could be done (but he refused to publish the results for fear of jail) …
    http://www.macfergus.com/niels/dmca/cia.html

    HDCP is the hidden enemy … the MPAA will just blacklist any device that allows you to use cracked AACS discs and then your HDMI out will be shut down …

  57. dualmeister

    There’s no doubt it will be cracked. Just do it very quickly so that we can laugh at the waisted millions they spent yet again on developing it.

  58. Weeee

    “Not So Hollywood” has an important point. And he should mention that not only independent filmmakers would be excluded. The high res modes of HD-DVD and Blue-Ray could also trigger a revolution in smaller cinemas too. All the digital equipment is quite afforadable now. Large projectors, hi quality speaker systems and amuch better digital medium is really all the world needs, for creating a boom in smaller cinemas.

    The problem today is reproduction of the reels. This costs way to much. With an open HD format. ANYONE could make a independent, digital movies for the “masses” if the mediium was cheap enough. Digital indpendent filmmakers are what the big boys in media are _really_ scared of.

    Perhaps using a HD-Xvid codec, and several DVD’s would be an option for some time. But for professional us I think this would be to complicated as a STANDARD.


    Weeee

  59. Scott

    The above post by Not So Hollywood is wrong. You can master (to disk) and sell HD content that has no macrovision, no aacs, and no region coding. With the first two gone, hdcp is not enabled so you can play it on vista or whatever and any supported rez. The DRM in vista and any of the set top players locks out media that is using “licensed” tech to limit use. If the media doesn’t employ any of the licensed tech, then the DRM is not activated.

    Just as an example, you can buy a copy of Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon and play it using an HDCP capable upscaling player and send the video to a non HDCP video device (lcd projectors work great). Try it again with any retail disney disk or with starwars (won’t work). Similarly, you can take a retail disk, strip macrovision and unencrypt it, then burn back to disk and try that. Should work the same.

    Hollywood always has the option to not pay macrovison and css or aacs licensing royalties and send the media out unencumbered (like CTHD did). Cheers to the day that happens.

  60. Mart

    Isnt everyone also forgetting HDCP aswell? its jsut as big a piece of bull crap as AACS is… I live in the uk so a lot of peeps over here dont have fancy brand spanking new HDTV’s with HDCP built in or even a crappy HDMI port its all a loads of liscensing shit, we dont even have supposed Full HD (1080p) televisions over here either i personnaly cant wait for 50in SED or OLED Tech to be released.
    I also find it funny the way the call it High Defenition when its really jsut a Higher resolution since as i know of at the moment the highest resolution is something like 5K X 5K pixels on a 35MP camera (i find it funny how they count the individual colour pixels as actual pixels instead of a block of 3 as one pixel for cameras :P so really 35MP is really just a third of what it says)
    i personaly cant wait for people to crack AACS so good for you, your a great help to everyone. I also cant wait for someone to crack a copy of windows vista with the shit interface and Protected video path crap stripped out to re-allow native support for OpenGL again… oh yeah here we go again big companies knocking out smaller companies and open source software to use their own crap which barely runs Namely Nazisoft in this case with its Direct3D/X which looks good on the surface but its buggy as F**K like all microsoft software.
    i would like to boot the Windows adiction but for what i want to do there just not enought support for Mac/osx86 or Linux

    Anyway good luck mate cant wait to be able to play Blu-ray HD content on my Windows XP!!! machine without needing Vista for a long time untill someone rips the crap out of it and unlocks all the security crap

  61. John Wroughton

    I moved from the U.S. to Norway way back in ’81. Totally sold on HD after managing to get my WMVHD “Coral Reef Adventure” (REG 1) to play on my PC in a region 2 country (Norway), I have subsequently had trouble getting the WMVHD “Step Into Liquid” to play in Norway as they only allow it to play in the U.S. and Canada and supply a license one week at a time. I actually (after using many hours) managed to fake the location of pc using a proxy server through Canada. But when the week expired I was back to where I had started. I know that WMVHD might be on the fringes of this discussion. But I do hope someone puts a little effort in helping people living in the various regions to play HD dvds that might not correspond to the region in which they are living.

  62. Borgon

    Best luck in your engineering efforts, and spread your expertise!!! The more people able to contribute effectly in the fight for fair use, the better.

  63. Oli

    Good luck – but i think its quite tricky in the usa to such things, nowadays.

    greetings Oliver

  64. Some Guy

    John W – WMVHD has been cracked long ago. One can enjoy playing their WMVhd as a normal wmv file without any restrictions, in the original non-reencoded format.

  65. Karl

    I just wanted to wish you good luck in your future projects. I think what you are doing is a great service to us all, and I am very glad someone has the guts (and skill) to take a stand against these companies.

  66. Robert

    “I’m very dissapointed in Sony, Comcast and the Broadcasters. This is total BS. Now my $300 investment is worthless because it tells me I can’t record anything, what’s the purpose of it then?”

    Well, first off – buying any digital media device anymore isn’t an investment – it’s a money pit. I refuse to buy any more new crap DVD players, HD-DVD players, or whatever. I don’t bother buying movies anymore and I most certainly do not buy music CD’s.

    The result of this is that the Recording Industry doesn’t really get a dime from me anymore. Nor do the makers of DVD/CD players.

    No way I’m going to get stung on a TiVO, HD-DVD player, or any of that.. cause I simply won’t buy it, until they put value back in for the consumers.

    If people want this DRM crap to end – they will really boycott the industry. Everyone whines about all this, but yet still buys all this crap. I think you’ll be surpised how little you will miss TV once you find other stuff to do :)

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